Ask Angela: How can we convert an indoor wedding to an outdoor wedding?

Angela Phillips is a Senior Account Manager III at ZTERS Waste Solutions. She helps customers with some of their most challenging site service issues, and she answers your questions here on our website.

Dear Angela: With everything going on, we decided to play it safe and convert our indoor wedding to an outdoor wedding (just in case events get shut down). What are some things we should consider when making the switch?

First, congratulations on your wedding! And second, you’re in good company. We’ve seen a lot of people make the switch and convert an indoor wedding to an outdoor wedding in 2020. Here’s some of the advice we’ve been giving soon-to-be-newlyweds:

  1. Rent your portable toilets as early as possible. Typically, you’d be making these rentals up to a month or two in advance. Get your rental squared away as soon as you know you’re converting an indoor wedding to the great outdoors. This helps ensure you actually get some toilets! If you’re planning a summer or fall wedding, you might still compete with festivals, fun runs, municipal events, and outdoor enthusiasts who rent portable toilets. A lot will depend on circumstances in your area, so call early. You even have lots of event portable toilet options to choose from.
  2. Consider using temporary fencing to create private areas and to prevent gate crashing if you’re in a public area. Temporary fencing can be combined with fabrics and floral arrangements to create an unobtrusive addition to your ceremony or reception. It doesn’t have to look like a construction yard!
  3. Storage containers make great staging areas for catering, DJs or bands, and it creates a safe, lockable space for storing gifts and other valuables while you enjoy your big day. We help people bundle storage units with their outdoor restrooms and fencing all the time.
  4. This might seem self-promotional, but it’s true—you can get all these outdoor services through one company like ZTERS. You (or your wedding planner) have enough to worry about without tracking down several different vendors for toilets, fencing, and containers. If there’s a problem, we can help. And you’ll get one invoice instead of managing one from each different vendor. No one wants to sort through invoices on a honeymoon!

You might be wondering how many portable toilets you’re going to need. We use this handy chart from the Portable Sanitation Association International. If you don’t feel like wading through charts and doing calculations, you can give us a call. We do this literally every day and we can help you sort it out.

In fact, I’ve even answered a previous question about event portable toilets for outdoor weddings. Feel free to take a look before you call, so you have some ideas about what you’d like.

Times are challenging, but you can convert an indoor wedding to an outdoor venue. And it doesn’t necessarily have to be a big ordeal. Keep these ideas in mind and feel free to call us if you want some help figuring out what services are available. We help people rent portable toilets (and more) for events every day, and we’re glad to help you out.

5 Ways to Save on Commercial Waste

Property owners and facility managers often have to streamline to save on commercial waste, How often do you analyze how much money you throw away with the garbage? Commercial waste is costly. From wasted paper and packaging, to disposing of appliances and pieces of furniture, your company may spend hundreds of thousands of dollars annually on commercial waste services. Here are five ways you can analyze your output and save on commercial waste.

1. Create a “Green Team” 

Create a committee or a team of people within your facility to evaluate and reduce overall waste. For example, 70% of office waste is paper products. If you manage an office building, ask your Green Team to find ways to reduce paper waste in the office. There are many ways this can be done. Start with these ideas:

  • Set the printer defaults to print double-sided pages.
  • Send electronic copies of presentations before meetings (and skip the paper versions).
  • Encourage staff to re-use manila envelopes and file folders.
  • Update your mailing lists regularly to prevent direct mail and mailers from being returned undeliverable.
  • Create a culture of sustainability through trainings, office reminders, and recycling bins. 

2. Save on commercial waste by shopping providers

If your facility is located in a large urban area, you may have several choices of commercial waste providers. If that’s the case, then you’re in a good position to negotiate a more competitive contract for your commercial waste service. Whether or not you’re in a competitive area, a commercial waste broker may be able to find you a more affordable solution.

You can also do some research by asking other owners and property managers about their waste services. What do other facilities pay for their commercial waste management, and what’s included in their rates? It pays to contact a nationwide waste service company like ZTERS, because we help companies find custom waste solutions across hundreds of properties every day. We understand prevailing rates and services nationwide, and we can help you find the right products and service schedule for all your facilities.

3. Analyze dumpster usage, downsize if necessary 

Chances are, your company doesn’t fill its dumpster to the top before the dumpster is picked up. Ask your Green Team to measure your weekly dumpster usage and keep records about how full (or not full) your dumpster is before each pickup. 

If space in your dumpster is often wasted, downgrade your dumpster size or request fewer pickups. Analyze the number of dumpsters your company uses, as well as the size of the dumpsters. If you’re paying for two small dumpsters, you might save money by consolidating to one larger dumpster. 

Review prices with your waste services company and decide what size and type of dumpster is right for your business. Then decide how many times your dumpsters need to be serviced per month. Sometimes reducing the frequency of dumpster service will reduce costs without causing a waste buildup problem.  

4. Share the cost with neighboring businesses

Smaller facilities often don’t produce enough waste to make dumpster service cost effective. These companies often pay for more dumpster service than they need because waste companies have high minimum service levels.

What if you could share your dumpster with a neighbor and split the cost? If your facility is near other small property owners or small businesses, find out if another property owner or manager would like to share a dumpster. When making these arrangements, be sure to read the waste service contract carefully and discuss each aspect of the contract with the neighboring owner. Communication is key when entering into an agreement with another party. 

5. Recycle

In some areas, even with the ebb and flow of the recycling industry, recycling costs can be lower than waste disposal. Create a culture of sustainability in your facility and encourage occupants to recycle whenever possible. Talk to your waste service provider about your recycling options and come up with a plan that reduces the cost of waste pickup. Some materials can be sold for scrap or otherwise traded or sold to reduce your overall commercial waste costs.  

Commercial waste disposal doesn’t have to break the bank. To find out more about how you can save on commercial waste costs, call our commercial waste division. We’re glad to analyze your waste stream and find a solution that’s right for your budget.

Ask Angela: portable toilets for camping

Angela Phillips is a Senior Account Manager III at ZTERS Waste Solutions. She helps customers with some of their most challenging site service issues, and she answers your questions here on our website.

Angela, we’re going camping for a family reunion and there are going to be a lot of us camping in one place—all ages—with no facilities nearby. Can we take a portable toilet camping?

Great question. It’s one we hear every year, especially since “glamping” became a thing. We also get this question from scout troops. The answer is probably, with some caveats. It depends on where you’re camping and the type of terrain.

You could always purchase small, portable camping toilets from an outdoors store or online, but that’s not going to give you privacy, and you’ll be left with bags of waste to clean up. I’m guessing you want something that operates more like a traditional porta potty or restroom trailer.

There are several porta potty options available, including larger ADA-compliant toilets and restroom trailers with shower stalls. Depending on how many people you’ll have, and the size of the location, you could go with a delivered trailer, a traditional porta potty, or there are even tow-able portable toilets on flatbed trailers that you can tow to the site yourself.

When deciding on what to rent, keep in mind a delivery truck will need to access the area (unless you’re towing it yourself). Also, you don’t mention whether you’ll be on private land or a state or federal park. Either way you’ll need permission to park a toilet on your campground.

Some public parks will allow you to bring portable toilet trailers, but you need to check with the park services department. There may be permits and fees involved. And if they do allow porta potties, they may have specific requirements for placement and features. For example, beaches will most likely require a protective base to prevent any leaks from getting into the sand. Always check with the location before you rent a toilet to make sure you’ll be allowed to bring it with you.

Another consideration is access to water and electricity. If you rent a restroom trailer, you’ll more than likely need access to both. For large units like these, it may require an extra fee if they need to manually change out the water and sewage tanks. Be sure to find out what’s available near near the campsite and what you’ll need to deliver or service the toilet.

Taking a portable toilet camping is doable, you just need to do a little planning beforehand. Have a great family reunion! And give us a call if you need help finding the right product for your site. 

commercial waste

How to Conduct a Commercial Waste Audit

Property owners and facility managers know all about waste. From new waste reduction legislation to changes in the recycling industry, it’s important to measure a building’s waste output on a regular basis. Conduct a commercial waste audit to “right-size” a building’s waste service and make service contracts more efficient and effective.

These waste audit tips are taken from “Right-sizing Commercial Waste Solutions” by Dan Studer. Dan is the division manager for the ZTERS commercial waste division.

Why is a commercial waste audit important?

The Frontier Group, a policy research organization, estimates people throw away seven pounds of materials—per person—each day in the United States. Now multiply that by the number of residents or occupants in a building. That adds up to a huge amount of garbage.

Add to that the rising cost of recycling and new waste-related legislation. Property owners and facility managers have to keep close tabs on waste. Otherwise they’re paying overage fees, or worse, penalties for not disposing of waste properly.

How to conduct a commercial waste audit?

A waste audit, or waste assessment, establishes a baseline for future waste reduction efforts. Here’s a three-step method for conducting a basic waste audit:

  1. Examine waste records. Review waste hauling and disposal invoices, recycling contracts, supply invoices, and operating and maintenance logs. Identify costs associated with each phase of collecting and removing waste.
  2. Walk through the facility. Observe where waste is generated and where it ends up. Talk with members of each department to find out what type of waste is produced and where it ends up.
  3. Conduct a waste sort. Physically collect and weigh a day’s worth of waste. Decide how to quantify the waste. For example, is it paper, plastic, metal, or organic material? Determine which materials can be exchanged, sold, reused, or recycled.

Bottom-line benefits of a waste audit

Waste audits aren’t just useful for gauging and managing a building’s waste stream. It also helps property owners and facility managers determine how to improve recycling and reuse efforts. It identifies areas of overall system improvement. And it can provide data to help renegotiate waste contracts or evaluate new waste solutions.

ZTERS Commercial Waste Division helps commercial property owners and facility managers evaluate their waste streams and find the right solution to meet any budget. We work with properties nationwide to provide custom waste solutions, one point of contact (no matter how many facilities you own or manage) and streamlined invoicing with one account manager.

Streamline your waste service with ZTERS. We’re your one-stop partner in commercial waste services. Give us a call to find out more.

waste advice from ZTERS

Ask Angela: How do we winterize portable toilets?

Angela Phillips is a Senior Account Manager III at ZTERS Waste Solutions. She helps customers with some of their most challenging site service issues, and she answers your questions here on our website.

Hi Angela: Is there anything we need to do to winterize portable toilets? We’ve got porta potties on a jobsite, and it’s scheduled to run through the winter. We don’t want to end up with a frozen mess, you know?

Angela: With winter coming, this is a great question. We hear this every year from customers in cold climates. In most cases, your vendor is going to handle any portable toilet winterizing for you. In fact, whether you want it or not, many portable toilets come prepackaged with winterizing chemicals and a winterization fee of $10-20 per billing cycle per toilet. That’s already built in when you rent. But that’s not always the case, so it’s good to know what to do with toilets in winter.

The first part of the answer is it depends on where you’re located. If you’re in the South, or in areas that don’t freeze very often, you probably don’t need to do anything special. One or two days of freezing weather likely won’t cause a problem.

But if you’re in an area where temperatures regularly drop below freezing, your portable toilet vendor will need to come out and winterize porta potties. This is something we help our customers schedule, but you can also bring it up to your vendor before the temperature drops.

Here’s what’s involved in porta potty winterizing:

In most cases, the vendor drops a special chloride pellet mix into the toilet each time it’s serviced. These pellets protect the porta potty from freezing in temperatures as low as -25 degrees Fahrenheit. These need to be refreshed weekly, so your service schedule needs to be regular for this to be effective through winter.

What about places where temperatures regularly drop below -25 F? In some areas it makes more sense for vendors to simply swap out the toilet. Each time they service, they’ll remove the existing toilet and drop off a new one. This is a pretty expensive option, though, and it can be labor intensive. This isn’t common, but you may see this depending on how cold it gets in your area.

A more common version of the swap-out is the tank swap-out. Some portable toilets now have smaller collection tanks, and these tanks can be swapped out instead of removing the entire toilet. With these porta potties, a vendor will just remove the existing tank, insert a new tank, and you’ve got a clean, non-frozen porta potty through winter.

For most jobsites in the U.S. you’re going to see the chlorine pellet method. There are some other things you can do to help prevent freezing, though. For example, move porta potties to a protected area that limits their exposure to wind. Place them against a wall or pack sandbags around the base to help prevent winter winds from freezing the contents. Wind-chill is a major reason porta potty freeze in the first place.

You can also invest in small space heaters that are specifically made for porta potties. Check with your vendor on whether they recommend this method for your particular toilets. Placing them in an enclosed area would be ideal, if that’s possible.

One last thing to consider in winter is whether to swap out your single portable toilets for a restroom trailer. Restroom trailers are larger and can be ordered with multiple stalls inside. If you have the space and electrical access, they can be heated and are way more comfortable for crew members.

We help contractors and project managers find winter solutions for construction sites every year. Give us a call if you have questions about your winter service options.

Top 10 Dumpster Rental Hidden Fees

Dumpster rentals might seem straightforward—you just have a dumpster delivered and picked up, right? But dumpsters aren’t a one-size-fits-all service. And when you’re gathering quotes, you might be surprised at the wide range of prices quoted to you. If you look up the national average cost for dumpster rentals, it may seem low compared to rates you’ll hear from vendors in your area. That’s because rates and fees vary dramatically from region to region. While some websites claim dumpster rental fees are anywhere from $200 to $900, you’ll quickly find out those “low prices” probably come with dumpster rental hidden fees.

Why is there such a difference in rates? Most often it’s because there are local and regional fees many haulers don’t tell you about in the initial quote. These dumpster rental “hidden” fees can add significant charges to your final invoice. And you may not know they’re coming.

How much more could you be paying on your final invoice? Sometimes as high as double the original estimate. A company may have a low initial quote, then tack on fees for “additional services” that are actually required to use the dumpster rental. If you’re shopping for dumpster rental services, these are 10 of the most common “hidden” fees that drive up the price of your service.

1. Environmental or fuel surcharges

It makes sense to charge for fuel, right? After all, it costs money to buy the fuel to deliver the dumpster to your location. Many companies will charge an additional 5-8% or more to cover this cost. But some companies have been known to charge up to 35% extra as “fuel and environmental” fees! Fuel and environmental fees should be clearly stated in the estimate. If you don’t see an environmental or fuel charge on the initial quote, ask for their rate. Keep in mind some companies may only add this charge if the location is outside a specific service radius.

2. Taxes

We all know we’re going to pay taxes on most items, but would you know to expect dumpster rental taxes if it wasn’t included in your quote? When gathering estimates from different companies, ask them how taxes are handled. State and local tax rates can add as much as 13.25% to a bill, or even more in some areas. While you can’t avoid taxes, you can avoid this “hidden” fee. Be sure to ask if tax is included or what the tax rate will be for your dumpster rental.

3. Trip distance fees

This fee is usually charged for one of two reasons. Either the location was farther than anticipated in the original quote, or the job site is far from the main road or difficult to access. In both cases, you’ll likely see a trip distance fee added. Are you in a rural area? In most cases you’re going to see mileage fee, so be sure to ask about that. And if there are obstacles that prevent the driver from delivering the dumpster, you may still have to pay for the mileage. Avoid this fee by being open about the distance and road availability. And ensure there is enough room for the delivery truck once the dumpster arrives.

4. Pick-up fee

A pick-up fee is usually standard and openly quoted when you rent a dumpster. But what about early or late pick-ups? Or what if you need service outside the normal delivery and pick-up schedule? Sometimes it happens! If things change during your job and you end up needing early, late or more frequent dumpster service, don’t be surprised to see a fee on your final invoice.

5. Damage waiver fees

A damage waiver fee protects you from any costs associated with dumpster rental damage or lost time. These waivers have a limit, such as $500 of damage, but it can be an important type of protection when renting a dumpster. Whether you find it useful or not, you need to know ahead of time if this is a required cost. Be sure to ask if you don’t see it in your estimate.

6. Concrete fees

Ever wondered why haulers ask what kind of debris you’re throwing out when you rent a dumpster? Different materials have to be disposed of differently. It generally costs more to dump concrete, for example, so if you’ll be using your dumpster for concrete disposal, you can expect to pay a higher price. Be sure any special materials charges are noted in your quote. You’ll get charged for things like concrete disposal even if you failed to tell the hauler about it in advance.

7. Insurance coverage

You may or may not want dumpster rental insurance, but some haulers require it. If insurance isn’t mentioned at the outset of your rental agreement, be sure to ask about it. If you don’t, you may be surprised to find that line item on your final invoice. Always ask for upfront pricing, especially on insurance, so you clearly understand what you’ll be paying.

8. Seasonal fees

Certain times of the year cause fluctuations in price. For example, what if you live in an area where winter weather is harsh? you may pay a premium for delivery and service during winter months. This generally comes up in the quoting process, but double check any fees related to extreme weather conditions.

9. Excess tonnage

When you’re looking for a dumpster rental, you’ll need to estimate how much you expect to dump. Some rentals come with a set amount of tonnage included. If you suspect you could go over the included limit, be sure to ask how much excess tonnage will cost. Otherwise, if you exceed the agreed upon amount, you will definitely end up with an excess tonnage fee. A good waste broker will be able to help you estimate tonnage if you’re not sure.

10. Human error

Dumpster rental companies are run by humans, and humans can make mistakes. Maybe the wrong rate was entered, or an extra delivery fee was mistakenly tacked on. After delivery, check your invoices carefully, and ask about any fee that wasn’t included in your quote. In some cases, the fee may be human error. Don’t be afraid to call and ask about any unfamiliar charge.

At ZTERS, we know the questions to ask to avoid dumpster rental hidden fees. We’ve brokered thousands of dumpster deliveries and construction site service rentals nationwide for more than a decade. And we negotiate on your behalf, so you receive upfront pricing and no unexpected “hidden” dumpster rental fees. Give us a call today and let us help find the right dumpster rental for your specific project.

waste advice from ZTERS

Ask Angela: How to clean up after a storm, fire, or disaster

Angela Phillips is a Senior Account Manager III at ZTERS Site Solutions. She helps customers with some of their most challenging site service issues, and she answers your questions here on our website.

Angela, we’ve been watching news coverage of weather and flooding and wondering about the process of cleaning up after a storm. Can a waste services company come in and clean everything up, or does the city help, or are we on our own as homeowners? Thanks in advance.

Angela: This is a really great question. We all hope no one ever has to rebuild their home—whether it’s from a storm, a tornado, a fire, or even a flood like we’ve experienced in our hometown of Houston—but, the fact is, it does happen. And as a homeowner, you may not know your options.

First of all, when you have catastrophic damage, there’s a good chance you’ll have to wait a couple of weeks before you can start removing debris at all. If you had a house fire, most cities will have you wait a few weeks before that debris can go to a landfill. If it’s a large-scale catastrophe, like a flood, it might take a couple of weeks for an appropriate location to be chosen to receive all that debris.

Now comes the question of what you can do. Unfortunately, as a homeowner you’re kind of on your own for removing debris. Most people hire a general contractor to manage the process, and that company may or may not work directly with your insurance company to get that removal paid for.

Some people go out on their own and try to manage the process themselves. That’s totally up to you, and we have worked directly with homeowners before. Just know most haulers and waste service companies won’t deal directly with insurance companies. It’ll be up to you to know your insurance coverage and sort out payment on your own.

Sometimes people think FEMA will come in and clean up after a catastrophe, but they don’t clear private property. We actually wrote a blog post about storm debris dumpster rentals, so you can check that out for details.

It’s a good idea if you live in an area that’s prone to events like flooding, tornadoes, and extreme weather, to get some kind of game plan in mind in case you ever need to rebuild. Educate yourself on what licensed contractors do and what your home insurance covers. Hopefully it’s information you’ll never need, but the aftermath of an event isn’t the best time to figure out how rebuilding works.

If you decide you want to do it yourself and be your own contractor, keep in mind dumpsters and portable toilets will probably be in short supply after a major event. Prices will go up because haulers may need to borrow units from other areas and ship them in—and that’s going to add to the expense. Expect delays in deliveries and services, but know most dumpster and portable toilet companies are small operations and will work to accommodate everyone in a fair and timely manner.

At ZTERS, we do help people find dumpsters and portable toilets after catastrophic events. Usually we get calls from contractors, but we’re glad to help individuals, too. One thing we always tell people, though, is be sure you understand your insurance policy coverage. Haulers and portable toilet vendors—whether you go through a company like ZTERS or not—aren’t going to bill an insurance company. They’ll bill you or your contractor. So, make sure you know how your coverage works before you set out to DIY.

How to Protect Against Construction Job Site Theft

In the construction industry, job site theft is a serious problem. High-value equipment and materials combined with unsecured locations are tempting to thieves. This is especially true if the job site is in a remote location. The National Equipment Register estimates the cost of equipment theft each year falls between $300 million and $1 billion. And companies that have equipment stolen only recover it around 22 percent of the time, so these losses are usually permanent. In addition to monetary loss, stolen equipment causes your project to come to a screeching halt. You can’t work without your gear, and this sets you behind on your deadlines. So, how do you protect against construction job site theft?

It helps to remember job site theft is a “theft of opportunity.” Thieves look for opportunities that are easy and fast. Make the opportunity less enticing, and you’ll reduce the risk. These five tips will help you protect your job site.

1. Install quality temporary fencing

A barrier between your job site and the rest of the community is your first line of defense. The right temporary fencing creates a barrier that makes it nearly impossible to remove large equipment from the job site. Choose options like barbed wire or a pounded post chain link fence. These deterrents make it harder to move the fencing. When a potential thief sees fencing in place, he already thinks twice about entering the job site and will move on to an easier target.

2. Use lockable construction storage containers

A fence is a first line of defense, but you can do more to make your job site secure. Add lockable, weatherproof construction storage containers for additional security. Insist all tools and valuable materials are stored inside at the end of the day. You can also store large equipment and electronics inside. Doing so protects your equipment and materials from theft and from the elements. Should a thief get across your fence, or a rainstorm hits during your downtime, your most critical items are still safe.

3. Keep it lit

Hiding under the cover of darkness is important to thieves. Keep your space well-lit to deter potential crime. Security lighting that stays on all night is helpful in keeping your space protected, but that can be expensive and not energy efficient. To save on energy, use motion detector lights that only turn on when someone approaches. Also make sure the lighting illuminates the entire job site, or at least any areas where equipment and materials are stored. Eliminate as many shadowy areas as possible, and thieves will go looking for a less-lit target.

4. Set an alarm

Job site theft risk drops significantly when you install an alarm system. If a thief enters your construction job site and hears an alarm, he will run. Alarms also alert those around your job site to the theft, so help can get to the site more quickly. Alarm systems may have flashing lights and other deterrents as well as audio alarms. With most systems, you can set mobile alerts to keep you in the loop when problems happen.

5. Invest in surveillance

Visible surveillance cameras make thieves think twice about entering your job site. They also provide photo and video evidence of any thieves who do steal from you. This increases the chance you will recover your property. It’s not enough to just buy a dummy camera, although that’s an option. Installing a full video surveillance system is relatively inexpensive compared to the cost of a major job site theft.

And one bonus tip: If you know your job site is going to house a lot of expensive equipment and materials, consider investing in a security company. Nothing quite beats a human security guard patrolling the area. On-site security prevents theft, and it also helps prevent illegal dumping and other illicit activities on the property.

Securing a job site against theft requires some thought and action, but it’s a job worth doing. ZTERS offers construction fencing and storage container rentals, and we can help you decide on the right products and services to help protect your job site. We’ve been providing construction site services to companies for more than a decade, and we work with thousands of vendors nationwide. Give us a call to find out how we can help.

Planning an outdoor wedding? Here are your portable toilet options

Outdoor weddings are a great way to experience natural spaces as you celebrate your union. Planning an outdoor wedding sometimes takes a little more effort than a traditional indoor event, especially when it comes to scheduling logistics like portable toilets. Even if the outdoor venue has some toilet facilities, they may not be sufficient for all your guests. Thinking about a remote location like a beach or campground? As wedding destinations become increasingly remote, toilet facilities may not be available at all. If you’re planning an outdoor wedding, here’s what you need to know about your outdoor portable toilet options.

Porta potties for outdoor weddings

When shopping for portable toilet rentals, you have two basic size options. Standard portable toilets stand around 91 inches high and are 44 inches wide and 48 inches deep from the outside. Inside, standard units have a depth of 21 inches and a width of 42 inches. (The toilet tank takes up part of the porta potty space.) This can be pretty cramped, particularity for wedding guests and brides in flowing gowns.

Toilets that are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, are deeper and wider. They have a width and depth of 77 inches each. The additional space provides added floor space, making the toilets large enough for someone in a wheelchair to maneuver.

How many portable toilets for a crowd?

When choosing the toilets for your wedding, you need to ensure you have both the right type of toilets and the right number. Most wedding planners recommend one toilet per 25 guests, especially if there’s an open bar. (For obvious reasons!) For a wedding anticipating 150 guests, plan for three to four stalls for women and three stalls for men. However, adding more toilets will improve the comfort of your guests.

In addition, consider adding at least one ADA-compliant toilet. The additional floor space will be helpful to guests with young children, older family members and other guests who may have mobility needs, and even the bride yourself with your gown and its added layers. The larger restroom space will create a better overall experience for your guests and your bridal party.

If your location has access to water and electricity, you may be able to rent a restroom trailer with sinks and stalls. At ZTERS, we work with brides and wedding planners to find the right portable toilets for your location and the time of year when you’ll be getting married.

How far in advance should you rent?

In warmer months of the year, portable toilet rental is in high demand. Many summer brides are surprised to learn that the company they chose for portable toilet rental has run out of available toilets, especially the high-demand ADA-complaint models. If your wedding falls on a week when your community has several outdoor events or large festivals, you will have even more trouble finding available toilets.

Plan to book your toilets two to three months in advance. If you have your date and location reserved earlier than that, go ahead and start calling to make those toilet reservations. Fall brides should also be aware October is usually the busiest month for renting portable toilets. With all those hay rides, pumpkin patches, and outdoor haunted houses, toilet rentals can be hard to come by.

Portable toilet rental may not be the most glamorous part of your outdoor wedding, but it is one of the most important factors. It’s also the easiest to forget. Make portable toilets a main part of your wedding planning to ensure the entire day goes off without a hitch. We schedule toilet rentals nationwide, 365 days a year. Give us a call to help find the right toilets for your wedding.

waste advice from ZTERS

Ask Angela: What kind of porta potties will show up at my outdoor wedding?

Angela Phillips is a Senior Account Manager III at ZTERS Site Solutions. She helps customers with some of their most challenging site service issues, and she answers your questions here on our website.

Dear Angela, I’m planning an outdoor wedding, but I’m worried the portable toilets will end up being gross. I don’t want our guests having a negative bathroom experience. Should we go ahead and rent them, or is there another option?

Angela: First, congratulations on your wedding! And kudos on planning an outdoor event. A lot of people call us with questions and concerns about the quality of portable toilets at their events, so I hear this question a lot.

Most people don’t realize this, but the toilets used at events aren’t what you probably picture when you think about portable toilets on construction sites or work zones. You’re not going to get a dirty, worn out bathroom at your event.

There are two things to consider with event toilets. First, there’s a porta potty life cycle. And second, there are several different options to choose from.

Believe it or not, there’s a natural life cycle to portable toilet rentals. When they’re first constructed and brand new, those are considered event-grade toilets. Once they’ve been used for a while and they’re not as new, they move on to become construction site toilets. They’re still nice toilets! But they’re not as new as when they were first built.

The point is, there’s a gradation that happens where they move down the line until their useful life is over. So, you won’t need to worry about low-quality toilets being delivered to your wedding.

Next, you have several options for your toilet rental! There are event toilets that are just toilets and urinals. There are toilets with sinks instead of urinals. There are even flushable units that have a manual flushing system! They use gravity to make the portable toilet a lot more like a regular toilet. In other words, your guests won’t see down in the tank!

And since it’s your wedding, you may want to ask about an ADA or wheelchair-accessible unit. They’re a little larger and will better accommodate you in your dress and your bridal party if they’re wearing large or constrictive dresses. You’ll all have more room to move around.

One last thing I always like to mention—make sure you book your toilets up to three months in advance. Especially during the summer months, because there are so many festivals and outdoor events. You should book your toilets early, but even if you forget (and a lot of people do!), we can probably help you find last-minute toilets if you give us a couple days’ notice. You may have to pay a fee for ordering on short notice but give us a call and we’ll do our best to find what you need.

Most people don’t realize this, but October is actually the busiest month for portable toilets because there are so many haunted houses and pumpkin patches that run all month. If your wedding is in the summer or October—call and rent those toilets at least three months in advance!

I hope that helps put your mind at ease—you and your guests will be perfectly fine in your porta potty rentals. And if you need help figuring out how many to rent or what type is best for your guests, give us a call here at ZTERS and we can help you get what you need.